Episode 30

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Published on:

14th Mar 2024

How do you run a family, run a business and run an ironman (as a woman) with Camille

Camille's Story

Camille was born with a rare heart condition and in the 80’s – conventional medicine wanted her to endure major open heart surgery to ‘fix it’. Camille was told to not run around, not to do PE and not to exercise that her skin may turn yellow and without the necessary ‘fix’ procedure my max life span would be around the 40. Ignoring most of this advice captained the school hockey & netball teams, competed in swimming competitions, tennis matches and was even in the army cadets for 6 years. 

Then in 1998 – advances in research and medicine lead to her being the first child in Manchester in the UK to have the heart surgery without being cut open. The surgery was a success and Camille has never looked back. 

Since then Camille has ran marathons, endured cycling events, open water swimming events and even competed in a charity boxing match to name a few. Camille is a mother of two, business owner and triathlete and is currently training for Ironman Denmark.

Camille's BIO

Personal wellbeing has slid down the priority list for many people in our modern society to our detriment. After Camille Pierson learned this fact the hard way, she changed her life to put wellbeing at the forefront of everything she does in her business as well as her personal life. After spending years as a marketing professional, Camille moved away from the corporate world to setup The Float Spa, a multi awarding winning health and wellness centre based in Hove. Offering floatation therapy, yoga classes, massage, an infrared sauna and other complementary therapies.

With the success of The Float Spa – starting from nothing and leading to a clientele of over 30,000 people. Camille has learned through running it and immersing herself in the wellbeing world, she now prioritises helping people make the changes in their life they need to be happier, healthier and more fulfilled. Camille offers group workshops and one to one coaching to support her clients in making very small easy changes which add up to a huge impact on their health, fitness and happiness.

Get in touch with Camille

www.CamillePierson.co.uk

www.TheFloatSpa.co.uk  

www.FloatTrainingAcademy.co.uk

Get in touch with Sal

If this episode has caught your attention and you wish to learn more, then please contact me. I offer a free 20 min call where we can discuss a challenge your facing and how I may be able to help you.

Transcript
Speaker:

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Sal: Welcome to Mindset, Mood and

Movement, a systemic approach to human

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behavior, performance, and well being.

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Our psychological, emotional, and

physical health are all connected,

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and my guests and I endeavor to share

knowledge, strategies, and tools for

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you to enrich your life and work.

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Today I am talking with my guest Camille

Pearson and our subject is a really cool

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one and I'm going to ask Camille how

does she run a family, run a business and

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run an iron man as a woman because it's

a really big ask and Camille and I have

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had some really interesting conversations

beforehand and I'm absolutely

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intrigued with her, her life story.

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her health story and how

she, she runs all this stuff.

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It's absolutely wonderful.

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So I'm delighted to have Camille

join me today and hopefully

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this will be inspiring.

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This will show you that you can do a lot

of things and Camille has got, she's got

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the knowledge, she's got the experience

and she's got the know how and I'm

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going to hope to join this conversation

adding how all these can come together.

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So Camille, welcome.

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Camille: Thank you so much for having me.

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Sal: It's really good to have you here.

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So that's a pretty strong intro, right?

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So how to run it all.

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And I know in today's world, there is,

there's sometimes is this thing about

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trying to do it all, which perhaps

is not where we're going with it.

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So we're just going to carry out that.

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It's not about doing it all.

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It's about how do you do this well.

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And this is what I was really

intrigued when I first met Camille.

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so we're going to get into this, but.

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For those of you who don't know

Camille, she runs The Float Spa, she's

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a businesswoman, and she has a very

interesting backstory around health.

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So today, she's tough, she does Ironmans.

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It wasn't the case when you were

a young person, was it Camille?

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Maybe you could share with us a

little bit about your early years and

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perhaps how you, or the challenges

you came into the world with.

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Camille: Yes, so I was born in

the 80s, and I was actually born

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with a rare heart condition.

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It's actually not that rare anymore,

but, it, was certainly in the 80s the

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conventional medicine or conventional

route for recovery or healing or getting

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over it was, to have open heart surgery.

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So when I was born about six months

into my life, obviously I remember

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this well, obviously not, I was, I

had health complications and, it was.

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found out that I had this hole in my heart

and, they wanted to immediately cut me

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open and conduct open heart surgery, which

my mum was not really best pleased about.

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She was like, Oh, I don't

want to have a massive scar.

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She's very young.

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This seems Like extreme.

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So it was very much, oh,

we have to monitor it.

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And I, I just remember about, I think

it was about eight or nine when I

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first found out about this, because I

just thought going every three months

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to the cardiologist to be wrapped

up to any CG machine was absolutely

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normal but actually it wasn't.

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And so I would have all these checks

constantly and it was my mom and dad,

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and they weren't actually together for.

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My life, and we're having an

argument at the end of the bed

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saying you need to tell her and I

was like, okay I was eight or nine.

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I've got a ten year old now, so I

think that I probably would have told

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my child That's at that point, but

fundamentally I wasn't told and this

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is how I found out So I remember going

to school and running around telling

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everybody that I had a hole in my hand

Which was like, then the parents were

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then pulled in to have a word with the

headmaster and it's what is going on?

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And it was all a little bit chaotic, and

then I was told, oh, you're not meant

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to do sport, you're not meant to do

activity because the amount of pressure.

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And they monitor, the size of the hole.

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So every time we go in, we had a size

of the hole and the hole in my heart

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was actually the size of a 50 pence

piece, which is deemed quite big.

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And, yeah, so the way it works is oxygen

was not filtering through into my body

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properly, it was going back out, and,

it meant that carbon dioxide was going

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back in, and it just, the whole thing

was apparently a ticking time bomb.

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And, so the maximum age plan, they were

a bit like, at those times, oh, if she

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doesn't have any surgery, maximum age

would be 40, and she shouldn't be active,

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and she shouldn't do any of these things.

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And I was like, okay.

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When I found out of it, okay, I really

playing netball, and I really like playing

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hockey, and I'm a really good swimmer,

and I really like to do those things, and

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it was like, okay, so now I've found out,

and now I'm not meant to do anything,

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even though I have been active beforehand,

so it was always that question.

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And then I went to secondary school

and pretty much ignored all the advice.

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I captained the hockey team, I

captained the netball team, I

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literally played any form of sport.

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I loved PE, I was just constantly active.

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I was running all the time,

doing cross country races.

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I just did it all because I really

enjoyed it and it didn't affect me.

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And I think in when I was 12.

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That's the only subject I've never done

very well in was biology and ironically

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what I do now for a living is, and

we were studying the heart and the

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teacher, we were studying the heart and

I said, Oh, I've got an atrial septal

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defect and she turned around to me and

said, You can't have, you'd be yellow.

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And I was like, Okay, but I actually

do have that heart defect and she.

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argued with me in the class and

I just stood up and walked out

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the class and never set foot

into a biology lesson again.

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again, my mother was dragged in and

the discussions about my behavior,

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which I was a grade A student and

got an E in biology, just didn't

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really fit with what was happening.

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flash forward in 1998, I was very

fortunate to have keyhole surgery.

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I was the very first child in Manchester.

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to have this surgery.

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as a 15 year old, having keyhole

surgery through your groin with, 25

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doctors and nurses in a room was highly

embarrassing, but it did give me that

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chance to then be told live your life.

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I spent 12 months on aspirin

and then that was it.

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And it only really occurred again,

when I was pregnant really, that

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I never really had to discuss it.

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And the cardiologist said to me

okay, you're now fixed, that's it.

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And that's it really, so I've just gone

on to just live a life, but there's been

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some interesting people, some very high

level celebrities that have actually

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struggled with their heart and actually

have then found out in much later life

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that they had that same defect, and

their hearts were failing in their mid

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to late 30s, and when you're, you hear

about those stories, how fortunate I

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was to have that surgery and for my, my

mother to wait for the time for them to

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find that surgery, that, that level of

medical advances that then gave me this

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life that I can now be a normal person.

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Sal: Wow, what a story.

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There's several things that

really stood out to me in there.

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And yes, of course, the 80s, perhaps

even today, there is this narrative,

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isn't there, that if there's

something quote unquote wrong with

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a person, it's a heart condition,

there's this, you should do less.

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Now I know you and I probably have got

quite a strong view on this about doing

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more, doing less and appropriateness,

but isn't it interesting that, don't

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do sport, don't do this, don't do that.

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And.

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In some ways that knowledge has been

contravened a lot in more recent times

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to say actually if you want good health,

physical, mental, emotional, metabolic,

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you do need to be doing active movement

and it's so curious that you were given

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that advice and thank goodness for you.

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it seems like you rebelled

against that, which I love, it's

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no, I'm not going to do that.

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And, and of course you've

got to enjoy your childhood.

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Because you can't go back, this is such

an important thing I'm all about, like

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time is this fluid flow, don't miss

it, because you can't buy it back, and

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it sounds like you got that really,

really nice, I'm pleased to hear it.

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I'm really interested in to get into

the mind of you, about what happens,

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because this is not a new pattern, this

is something that clearly is happening.

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What happens when you're

told you can't do something?

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Camille: sometimes it's just take

time to digest about what you

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are being told you cannot do.

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don't jump off a cliff.

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I probably would agree with that.

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Unless you're wearing a, you know,

a parachute or something like that.

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But, there's, there's, there's parameters.

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And believe me, I am actually

a big rules follower.

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I love checking rules, following rules.

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All that stuff.

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I think when it comes to your body,

a lot of times, you know best.

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And even maybe with, if you're a parent

with a child as well, is that, my daughter

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got very sick when she was little.

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And we would go back and forth

to the doctors, and the doctors

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went, Are you a first time parent?

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this happens all the time.

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And it was only because of our

persistence she was then admitted

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to paediatric intensive care.

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It was that serious.

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And, I think being able to listen

to your body So if I, had a training

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session and I was getting out of breath

all the time and I couldn't breathe,

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I think there's something wrong.

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But if, if I was very, very unfit and

doing a, suddenly decided to do a 5km

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run, everybody would feel out of breath.

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But is it that you're feeling out

of breath because you're Different.

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Or is it because you are unfit?

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So I think the first really valuable

point is listening to your body.

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for me, I'd been doing

exercise, my whole life.

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I was super active all the time.

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And then to be told, okay, you

don't do, you can't do anything.

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Or stop doing that.

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And it's like, why am I stopping doing

that when I was doing it yesterday?

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What's the difference today?

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I haven't suddenly, something bad

hasn't suddenly happened today,

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I was exactly the same yesterday.

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I was listening to a really good

podcast exactly about this, or a

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book saying about how Bruce Lee was

told after a serious injury that he

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could never do anything again, and

actually how you can go on to retrain

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and listen to your body and actually

recover from really severe injuries,

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but being able to listen to your body.

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Sal: Lovely.

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Such an interesting point.

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So interesting to hear that you were

challenging that as a young, young person.

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What age were you when you were

given this first initial diagnosis?

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Camille: Six months.

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I was

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six months

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old.

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Sal: of course, okay.

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So six months, right?

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It's your parents having to feed that in.

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And when were you told

that you couldn't exercise?

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Camille: Well, technically, they told

me, that it was the school that said

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that I shouldn't do any exercise.

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And, whereas, with the cardiologist

that we were going back and forwards

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to, I don't believe, I haven't

asked this question to my parents

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actually, that I was told by the

cardiologist not to exercise.

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Then, maybe when I got older,

I was told not to exercise.

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Does that make sense?

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when I

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was a baby, it wasn't really addressed

then, but as they were monitoring

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it, it was like, Oh, you need to

not do too much, and, you've got to

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be careful because she's not having

the surgery, you need to watch it.

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So it was only when I started to get

bigger, because yes, I was getting

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bigger, my heart was getting bigger, and

the hole in my heart was getting bigger.

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So I believe it was as I came into

secondary school when everyone has that

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big jump, that it was around that time

that I was told then don't do anything.

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Sal: Interesting.

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Very interesting.

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Now, of course, if we, if we bring

the overlay that, that thinking,

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that approach to perhaps modern day,

modern day you, modern day people,

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our listeners, who aren't children.

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if you're an adult and you're

listening, then people may say

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that you shouldn't do things.

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And if it's a health

professional, of course you do

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need to take their knowledge.

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I've got a buddy of mine, he's been

a doctor, they train for years and

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years, they know so much stuff.

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But there's something very interesting,

isn't there, about between hearing

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something from another, a health

professional, a specialist, these

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sorts of things where people really

invest a lot of time and skill.

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And then checking that with your

own understanding and your own.

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Body.

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So what does your body say?

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Because that goes and

flips in several ways.

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You could be pushed, say in an

exercise class or training drills,

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you'd be pushed to go harder.

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But if that's not right, if

you genuinely feel your body's

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saying, no, that's too much.

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I'm getting too many,

get too much fatigue.

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I'm getting injured.

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Then maybe your body is talking

louder than your trainer.

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And then of course there's a flip,

which is perhaps you're, you're told

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to take it easy because you're over 40.

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my bugbear about as you get

older, you should slow down.

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I'm like, yeah, who

came up with that rule?

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Is that the person who drew the sign?

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the orange, the, sign where

you've got old people bent over.

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It's it doesn't always need to be like

this, but there is this trajectory

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after 40 that things start to fatigue.

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The body starts to, to break down.

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And the only way to do something

about that is to arrest it, which is

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health activity, physiology, exercise,

nutrition, mind, mindfulness, psychology.

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It is all of these factors of

the self, the human self, that

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need attending to, to stay well.

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In that instance, if someone's

saying, you should slow down.

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You're over 50 mate.

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And take it easy.

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It's Hmm, I'm not sure that's

credible advice when my body

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feels energy after training.

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So our body is a powerful messenger.

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And the question is how

can we listen to it better?

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That's what I, I'm interested in.

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So Camille, how do you listen to your

body in today's world as you train now,

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as you're, a business woman and a mom,

how do you listen to your body today?

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Camille: Oh, I'm always listening

to my body because I'm now over

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40 and I've got aches and pains.

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I think, to be perfectly honest,

if you look at me now and where

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I was when I was 30, I think I'm

fitter, younger, healthier, and

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everything now than I've ever been.

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Ironically, in my twenties,

yes, I was super active as a, a

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teenager, but then in my twenties I.

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I found Brighton and the evening's

entertainments here in Brighton and I

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think I believed that you could sleep

a lot when you were dead and that was

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the mindset that I would live and then

I had children and then things I suppose

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when you Start to put in perspective

that you are suddenly not just yourself,

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you're not reliant on yourself and

then you've got children and you're

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trying to lead a good example for them.

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I was a bit like, okay, I've always

enjoyed fitness and then it was like how

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you can then embed fitness into your life.

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I don't really going to the gym to

be honest, it's not, it's not for me.

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That's not my thing.

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I have lots of time for loads

of people that that's their

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thing, but just, it's not my bag.

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I do triathlons and people think I'm

crazy and that's absolutely fine.

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But I genuinely believe

that you can reverse aging.

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You can reverse aging, you

can Look after your body.

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You can listen to your body.

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I went in my regular meditation classes.

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I focus on the word interception.

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So everything you can feel

internally, what can you notice

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about the feelings in your body?

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And we do loads of work about that.

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And it is exactly how I live my life.

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I wake up in the morning and

you know how you get out of bed.

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can sometimes influence

how the whole day goes.

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Can you get out of bed and say,

Today's going to be amazing!

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Yes!

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Let's go!

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even when you're feeling that you've

had three hours sleep or whatever,

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you can still find the positive.

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And that kind of mindset does pull you

up, because, on your down days, and we

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all have down days, and when you get

up and it's minus three outside, and

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you're meant to go for a run at six

o'clock in the morning, you're like,

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how many layers of clothing can I wear?

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it's It's difficult, but your body does

support you, and also, the question I

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love to ask myself is how much better

do I feel after I've done something?

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Because no one feels worse after a run.

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Sal: Can I speak to that?

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Cause it's just such an important thing.

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I have this time and time again.

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So those of you, some of you know

my regular listeners know me, but

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in case this is new, I coach human

performance that covers psychology,

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emotional, breathwork and physiology.

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So I'm also a strength

and conditioning trainer.

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I've been a long time yoga teacher.

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I'm really interested when we, we'd shift

mindset around exercise, particularly

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for people who've been away from it

or haven't done it and they've got

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to maybe a certain point in their

life, it's, things aren't working.

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You don't feel well, you don't look good,

you, things just aren't working for you

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because your physiology and your body is

not in the right condition it needs to be.

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So it's okay, I'm going

to start some exercise.

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Great.

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And I've had the classic like,

oh, how do you, people say to

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me, how are you so motivated?

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I'm like, I'm not motivated.

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I've got structure.

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I've got purpose.

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I've got a really compelling reason.

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But like you, Camille, I ran,

I mentioned the other day.

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I ran out in the morning.

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It's like dark and rainy.

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I'm like, oh, this is just

miserable we're recording this

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in winter in the UK right now.

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I did not wanna be outside in the day, but

what I did want is I wanted the payoff.

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So the paycheck at the

end of that run was.

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Everything I know, metabolic

improvements, cardiovascular

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improvements, vitality, youth, energy,

mitochondrial shifts, cognitive shifts,

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like we got the knowledge on this now.

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So going for a run, the payoff is so

big, so big, that the price is cheap.

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And that's the way I see it.

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And I think in our culture, we've

obviously got, we've got to shift

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it sometimes because people say, Oh,

it's hard running or it's hard gym.

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Yeah, it might be a bit.

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But the payoff is so much softer, nicer,

better, and I think this is one that

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shifts and I really would like to get

your insights about what, take us through

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what drives you, what's your reason, your

motivation, whatever terminology you use

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and dial into to go on a run, to sign

up for a triathlon, to do what you do.

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Take us through how you approach this.

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Yeah.

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Camille: I used to, I mean I've run a

lot, I would be a stop start runner, so

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I'd run for a few months or sign up to

ce, so this is my past, so in:

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I completed my first marathon, I did the

Brighton marathon and I'd actually only

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trained for the half, and then I was

like, oh, I'm halfway there and it's my

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wedding and I want to look really good

on my wedding, so I'm going to do this.

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Okay, so I actually did the, the half

marathon and I think it's six weeks later

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I did the marathon and I did great and I

was like feeling good and I didn't have a

342

:

That was before we had like smart watches.

343

:

I think I had a heart rate monitor I just

don't really have any tech So I didn't

344

:

I actually the pace was the pace and I

wasn't really bothered and I thought I

345

:

did really And I was great And then I

had babies, I had my daughter, and then

346

:

after having my daughter, she got very

sick, and I opened, just after that,

347

:

I opened, the Float Spa, as part of

my recovery from her being ill, and we

348

:

haven't really talked about my breakdown

in:

349

:

story, and then I actually used, opened

my business, and then it suddenly became

350

:

focused on that, and I think 2015 was like

the, the first, Step into the wellness

351

:

world because I'd only really, I'd only

floated before and that was about it.

352

:

And then before my first float, I think

I'd had a massage on holiday, so I

353

:

wasn't really into the wellness scene.

354

:

my background before the Floats Spa

was in sales and marketing, and we

355

:

lived a thousand miles an hour and

everything was really stressful and.

356

:

It was just relentless stress and

busyness and you'd have to be at work at

357

:

8 o'clock and you have to leave at 7pm

and you don't get to see your family and,

358

:

ugh, oh my god, that is, ugh, horrible.

359

:

but that was the norm.

360

:

Then my daughter got ill and

actually then I got very sick and I

361

:

used floating to overcome that and

then I opened the float spray and

362

:

then it was like, okay, now what?

363

:

Just run the business and carry on

and, I think it was just after my

364

:

son was born in 2016 that I was a bit

like, Oh, I should really do a bit

365

:

more exercise, get really into it.

366

:

And then in 2017, I, met this

amazing gym and actually joined

367

:

a gym with a personal trainer.

368

:

And I said, I didn't like it.

369

:

And then, I worked with him

for a couple of years and then

370

:

I used to really love running.

371

:

And he's Oh, you should go for more runs.

372

:

I was like, Okay, cool.

373

:

Yeah.

374

:

And then I was like, okay, so I

started running a couple of times

375

:

a week, not really like fast, just

like plodding along and carrying on.

376

:

And then 2019 came and I decided

in my goal setting, which I always

377

:

do, and I teach goal setting and

with all my coaching clients, etc.

378

:

And I decided to sign up to

a white collar boxing match.

379

:

So you can see I was a very traditional

type of there's an event and then

380

:

you've got to work out how to do it.

381

:

And then I would do things like, the

half marathon and it was always an

382

:

event triggered me to be motivated.

383

:

And that's very common.

384

:

And I see that with clients.

385

:

And then once I started this world of

running again, I was like, Oh, I feel

386

:

I'm getting a bit older now and my joints

shouldn't be running four times a week.

387

:

And what do I like?

388

:

And I was like, you know what?

389

:

I've never.

390

:

I've, this world of triathlon,

maybe I could do a triathlon.

391

:

I used to love swimming.

392

:

but I know about water chemistry

through the floats bar, so I

393

:

was really fussy about getting

in a swimming pool and the sea.

394

:

That's another story.

395

:

so I was like, okay, just,

just going to the pool.

396

:

And I had this bike that I used

to ride, and I was a bit like, oh,

397

:

this bike is, there was, I would run

over on it, and it was all like, oh.

398

:

Bit traumatic.

399

:

So it's like releasing some of the trauma.

400

:

I'd lost a baby on this bike and I

was like, just get rid of the bike.

401

:

It's a mindset.

402

:

It's get rid of the bike

because the bike's the problem.

403

:

You're not the problem.

404

:

So I bought myself a bike and then

decided to sign up to a triathlon,

405

:

not having a clue what to do.

406

:

just thought it'd be really

interesting just to try it.

407

:

And then, yeah, then the bug has hit,

but I now do lots of events, swimming

408

:

events, running events, cycling events,

all three, full distance, short distance,

409

:

sprints, all these different world.

410

:

and originally it was all about being

motivated just by an event, but now it's.

411

:

if I don't exercise a day,

I just don't feel normal.

412

:

And my people say when I tell people that

I exercise seven days a week, they think

413

:

that exercising is like me doing like

a thousand percent effort every time.

414

:

And I don't, there's days where I'm

doing like a run and it's, basically it

415

:

doesn't feel much faster than a walk.

416

:

And there's days where I do.

417

:

Sprinting and it's really, really fast.

418

:

And people go, oh, that's really fast.

419

:

And I go on a cycle ride or put the

indoor bike on at home, just sit there

420

:

watching TV and watching Netflix whilst

my legs just spin around for an hour.

421

:

And it's a really easy one.

422

:

And then there's times

where it's like sprinting.

423

:

And I come in and everyone looks at

me and my husband and the kids look

424

:

at me and go, you had a workout today,

then . And it's just mixing it up.

425

:

But fundamentally.

426

:

I love the feeling what your body

feels when you've done exercise, and

427

:

I cannot live without it, really.

428

:

Sal: Fascinating.

429

:

So, interesting.

430

:

I want to unpick a little bit of that.

431

:

for those people who are either

starting the journey, want to

432

:

start the journey, somewhere in the

journey, we are all differently.

433

:

We're motivated by different

things, external motivation,

434

:

internal motivation, or external,

intrinsic, external, externals, big.

435

:

It works for a lot of people.

436

:

My partner signed up for a

half marathon and she did it.

437

:

And when she hasn't signed up

for it, she doesn't run much.

438

:

Although I train her

most of the time, but.

439

:

If that's how you roll, you leverage it.

440

:

So understanding your mind,

that's what I do with people,

441

:

help people understand their mind.

442

:

So if you're externally driven,

fine, sign up for a marathon, half

443

:

marathon, 5k, it doesn't matter.

444

:

Zumba, Zumba competition,

it doesn't matter.

445

:

But that will give you the the

focal point and the reason,

446

:

the shape and the structure.

447

:

I'm internally driven.

448

:

I could just go train because

I'm fortunately I'm very

449

:

kinesthetically connected.

450

:

I'm very connected to my body.

451

:

that's thanks for years of yoga that, that

gave me that connection and enriched it.

452

:

And the feeling is Everything.

453

:

The feeling of being strong is priceless.

454

:

So we talk about Seder symbols, back

in the day when I was born, the men

455

:

of my age would have was seeks a

big car or something like that or

456

:

a, a couple of million in the bank.

457

:

Now I, I did a lot of the guys I'm talking

to, they want to say the symbol of a body

458

:

that's fit and strong and dynamic and,

and that they feel very comfortable in.

459

:

So it's very interesting that we can

play around with whatever drives us.

460

:

Know what drives you, go with that.

461

:

That would be my, my understanding

and you've already alluded to that

462

:

and it's interesting, isn't it?

463

:

I want to say something.

464

:

I know some people can be intimidated.

465

:

by the early part of this journey.

466

:

If you're coming from sedentary lifestyle,

sales and marketing, doing 12 hour days.

467

:

I worked in advertising when I was young.

468

:

So I know all that vibe.

469

:

It can be intimidating.

470

:

When you look at someone you're

like, Oh my God, they're a triathlete

471

:

or you train all this time.

472

:

It can be intimidating because it's scary.

473

:

And I've cited this example, I got into

CrossFit in my mid 40s and I was doing a

474

:

lot of yoga at the time and yoga is, I was

very good at yoga, if you can be good at

475

:

it, whatever that term means, and I went

to CrossFit and I was absolutely rubbish,

476

:

I was, I was very weak compared to most

of the girls there, let alone the male

477

:

athletes, and I was really intimidated.

478

:

My ego was really squashed down.

479

:

Thankfully, because the work I do

with psychology and human behavior,

480

:

that I was able to manage that ego

squashing and stay with the process.

481

:

It took me five months to feel okay.

482

:

And that was going twice a week, every

week, CrossFit and doing some other stuff.

483

:

So that took five months of commitment

to see, is this going to work out?

484

:

And one thing I find, and I want

to get your view on this, it

485

:

does need a long term approach.

486

:

So signing up for a triathlon or going to

the gym today and seeing do you like it?

487

:

You probably won't.

488

:

You probably, you probably hate

it because you're her and it's

489

:

awkward and you'll feel a bit weird.

490

:

But if you go on that evidence rather than

going on a long term evidence, you're,

491

:

you're gonna possibly miss out now.

492

:

I'm really intrigued about, so we're

speaking about motivation and driving.

493

:

How do we prioritize is a

really key thing, right?

494

:

You're a mum.

495

:

You run a business.

496

:

You're super busy.

497

:

I've got my own business.

498

:

I've got loads of things that I have to

do and lots of clients and And I know

499

:

how I roll and I'm happy to share that.

500

:

But I want to know how you do your

prioritization because I hear so many

501

:

people say, Oh, I haven't got the time.

502

:

I'm like, Camille has got the time.

503

:

I've got the time.

504

:

We've all got the same time.

505

:

It's 24 hours in a day.

506

:

No one gets any different.

507

:

It's the same gift.

508

:

You live one of those days,

you get the gift of 24 hours.

509

:

What you do with it is up to you.

510

:

Now.

511

:

I'm going to be gentle here.

512

:

I know some people have a high demand.

513

:

They might have to have roll up a

big job to keep the family going.

514

:

I understand how difficult it is.

515

:

I coach people like this all the time.

516

:

So we're not going to say isn't,

but how do you get this training

517

:

priority into your life with, you

are a mom, you are a business owner,

518

:

you've got a lot on your plate.

519

:

How do you make it work so that we

can help others understand how maybe

520

:

they can make it work for them?

521

:

Camille: So my big thing as well is also

encouraging the children to see you do it.

522

:

So that's just something that I love.

523

:

So is, there's times when my husband goes

and, I help at a run club, for example,

524

:

and he's oh, me and the kids are going

to come down and meet you afterwards.

525

:

I was like, okay, that's cool.

526

:

I've got the kids bikes.

527

:

We'll go for an hour run.

528

:

So my husband and I go for a run together.

529

:

And the kids are on their bikes, so they

don't know, my son is 7 and my daughter's

530

:

10, so they go for a nice flat bike

ride on the seafront, with the wind,

531

:

it's always a bit of a challenge, and my

husband and I just run alongside them,

532

:

and we do that quite a bit, so it's an

hour activity that's free, on a Sunday

533

:

for example, and that means I'm getting my

training session in, my husband's getting

534

:

a training session in, and the kids are

out in the fresh air, so that's That's an

535

:

example of how you can do it as a family,

that obviously can't happen every day

536

:

because the kids have their own schedule,

my husband's got his own business, I've

537

:

got my own business, they're different,

very different, but on a Sunday is my,

538

:

my kind of planning day, I'm a big kid.

539

:

I love habits.

540

:

I love creating tiny habits, big habits.

541

:

I love challenges, outcomes, aspirations.

542

:

I love it all because we

can work towards something.

543

:

but for me on a Sunday, I do super fridge

Sunday, so do meal prep in the fridge.

544

:

And it's not putting everything

in pots and you just take it

545

:

out and it's a complete meal.

546

:

It's more like I'd always say going

to Subway and you've got everything

547

:

laid out like quinoa together, salad

together, meat or veg or whatever,

548

:

everything's all done in pots so you

can scoop it into a jar and shove

549

:

that in a pot and take that for lunch.

550

:

but I also do the same level

with my schedule for the week.

551

:

So I do have a triathlon coach.

552

:

it helps me understand not to

get burnt out, not to overtrain.

553

:

before I had a coach, I would like

to go for a 5k run and run it every

554

:

time trying to get faster and then get

frustrated that I wouldn't run it faster

555

:

each time, but I would do that four

times a week and almost destroy myself

556

:

in the process, and so now he helps

me slow down in order to get quicker.

557

:

so he schedules we chat about my week.

558

:

I have some things that are non

negotiable like on Tuesday nights

559

:

I always go swimming at 7 45 p.

560

:

m to 8 45 and it semi annoys me if

someone invites me to an event or there's

561

:

a party or there's something that needs

to go on because I'm like That's my

562

:

swim time I know it sounds ridiculous.

563

:

And on Friday mornings, my husband takes

the kids to school and so Friday mornings

564

:

are my other swim time because swimming

is harder to do because you're reliant

565

:

on a public pool being open, for example,

whereas a run, you can squeeze that into

566

:

your lunchtime, you can go in the morning

before work, you can go before the kids

567

:

get up, there's lots of times that you

can squeeze things in, so it's It's

568

:

really important to look at your schedule

and try, what my theory is, try not to

569

:

interfere with everybody else's schedule

to be over selfish, is the biggest thing.

570

:

My husband likes training, not for

triathlons, but he likes running, he

571

:

likes to go to the gym, so I don't

want to encroach on my time too much.

572

:

Obviously, as you get closer to race

day, so we're in off season now.

573

:

I don't have any big races for

four months, five months, four

574

:

months, and so I'm not on a bill.

575

:

So it's ticking over

just maintaining fitness.

576

:

It's just getting better,

Fine tuning some of my.

577

:

niggles or fine tuning some of the things

we're not very good at, so it's easier.

578

:

But as we get closer to race day, so in

July I did, the Half Ironman Swansea,

579

:

I had to schedule in four hour bike

rides on a Sunday, which is quite a

580

:

lot of your day when you already help

with a run club and you have kids and

581

:

they've got parties and everything.

582

:

So it's about working together with your

partner to make sure that they are On your

583

:

side and want you to achieve your goal.

584

:

And I have an amazing

husband that's really, really

585

:

supportive who helps me do that.

586

:

And a lot of the times I also

have friends that, I'm, I don't

587

:

mind taking a lunch break to go

for a run for an hour and a half.

588

:

I do that or an hour.

589

:

so I try to mix things into my

day as much as I can, but without

590

:

Sunday planning, I can't fit 10, 12

hours worth of exercise in a week.

591

:

And it is so important to plan.

592

:

Sal: Perfect.

593

:

It comes back to the

same thing, doesn't it?

594

:

It's feeling like you described earlier

and I was sharing my, my own view about,

595

:

it's not about the exercise per se,

it's about the payoff or the feeling

596

:

or all that good stuff afterwards.

597

:

And, and actually it's the same with

the, with the Sunday thing, isn't it?

598

:

It's not about.

599

:

Oh, because Sunday I've got to focus,

got to do meal prep, maybe a bit

600

:

of preparation, got to look at the

schedule, talk to husband or talk to

601

:

partner, figure out who's doing what.

602

:

But if you bother to do that, if you

choose to do that, okay, I'm going to

603

:

commit whatever amount of time there's

an hour or a couple hours of your day,

604

:

that payoff is like the week sorted.

605

:

Everyone knows what they're doing.

606

:

No one's kind of, no one's

time's being squashed because

607

:

we've respected each other.

608

:

We've spoken it through.

609

:

And we open the fridge.

610

:

Hey, there's some good stuff in

there, which is really nice when

611

:

you're like, Oh God, I've only got

a short amount of time for my lunch.

612

:

So it's really, such a, what I heard from

that is thinking ahead, looking ahead.

613

:

And from what you described, you're,

you're quite a forward thinking

614

:

individual from what you're saying

about goal planning and that

615

:

your, your orientation is quite

future orientated, which is great.

616

:

I think most of us are, we just

need to see it and choose this

617

:

is what my week looks like.

618

:

What I find interesting.

619

:

around dumping motivation.

620

:

So if you're not motivated and,

this time of the year, it's tough.

621

:

I went to the gym this morning

later than I would like to.

622

:

I'd love to be in the gym at six in the

summer and people who know me, they'll

623

:

say, Oh, what time do you get up today?

624

:

I'm like, Oh, half four.

625

:

Cause I will literally

get up when it's light.

626

:

But the winter, of

course, it's exact same.

627

:

It's it's really tough for

me to get up 15 right now.

628

:

before first light.

629

:

So I have to set an alarm at

this time of year and it's tough.

630

:

It's, it's really tough.

631

:

So it was a bit late this morning, went

to the gym, did my session, great session.

632

:

And it's about figuring out

the payoff, looking ahead.

633

:

So I did the same thing for my partner.

634

:

We do a diary check on a Sunday.

635

:

It's who's doing what, where you at?

636

:

we have dogs.

637

:

So we have dog commitments.

638

:

We have to do the dog walking

twice a day and making it work.

639

:

One thing I want to say about

this is I had a client and he

640

:

said to me, look, I'm in London.

641

:

I've got this, I'm running a business.

642

:

I want to do all my strength work

and my extra conditioning work.

643

:

I haven't got time.

644

:

And then I said to him, Hmm, I'm

not sure that's accurate because

645

:

you've got these windows of time

that you do at different times.

646

:

You've probably got 30 minutes every

day that you can maneuver with.

647

:

And in a 30 minute session,

you can do quite a lot.

648

:

So if you bought some dumbbells

or kettlebells or sandbags or

649

:

training bands at home, you could

put in a small drill at home.

650

:

You don't have to go

anywhere, you can execute.

651

:

So I think when we bring a mindset

of about looking at our time

652

:

windows in the head and going, What

can I do with that time window?

653

:

It's a better way of coming at it saying,

I need a three hour session at the gym

654

:

and I don't have it so I won't do it.

655

:

And I, and I wonder if that's

how, you mentioned lunchtime

656

:

runs and lunchtime training.

657

:

Is that, is that something you do?

658

:

You look at even if you've got a small

time window and build something in?

659

:

Camille: Totally.

660

:

I mean, one of my big things is

micro practices or tiny habits.

661

:

Um, it's like, you know, you've

got time in the day that you

662

:

don't realize you've got time.

663

:

I'm a big thing about

time management as well.

664

:

So not doing things twice, or three

times or four times, checking emails.

665

:

As an example, people check an email

on the phone, knowing that they're

666

:

never going to be able to action an

email until they get to the office.

667

:

So I was like, okay, so what

they do is read the email and

668

:

it could be a challenging email.

669

:

And they might read that at 7.

670

:

30 in the morning and they know that

they're not going to get to the office

671

:

until 9 o'clock, but in their mind

it's replaying this email and they're

672

:

suddenly distracted by this email

which is taking up a lot of time.

673

:

They then might be snappier with their

partner, lose it with their kids, just get

674

:

frustrated, a car cuts them up, whatever

it might be, something might happen.

675

:

They're still thinking about this email.

676

:

They then get to the office, open the

laptop or computer or switch it on, read

677

:

the same email again, and then take an

action and then wait for the result.

678

:

That's a waste of an hour

and a half in my time.

679

:

And so it's like, did you need to do that?

680

:

So when I say micro practices, I'm

talking, if you are struggling to start

681

:

with a fitness regime, things that I

would say, so what do you currently

682

:

do in your day that you always do?

683

:

Do you put the kettle on, for example?

684

:

So when the kettle boils,

what are you doing?

685

:

Are you checking Facebook or social media?

686

:

Or could you do three squats

while the kettle boils?

687

:

There's three squats more than

you did it every other day.

688

:

Could you do that every

time the kettle boils?

689

:

Could you do push ups on the

counter while the kettle boils?

690

:

If you've got stairs in your house,

when you get out of bed in the

691

:

morning, could you, when you walk

down the stairs, could you just run

692

:

back up them and down them again?

693

:

Okay, you suddenly got a little bit

of cardiovascular boost just by doing

694

:

that, and it feels really bloody good.

695

:

when you get to your desk,

do you sit down on a chair?

696

:

Could you sit down, stand up, sit down?

697

:

That's an extra squat.

698

:

There's ways of embedding things

into your day that you don't

699

:

actually realise that you're doing.

700

:

And these tiny little

practices are brilliant.

701

:

And then you realise that you

might have done ten squats.

702

:

Twenty Squats.

703

:

You could do this with the dumbbells

or whatever and it's a great way to get

704

:

more activity into your day and then

you've suddenly started this new regime.

705

:

Sal: Such a good point.

706

:

I come across this so many times.

707

:

I've coached many of my

clients around these points.

708

:

In fact, if anyone's received

an email from me, on the bottom

709

:

it tells you my working times

when I'm likely to be around.

710

:

It also says I don't get to check emails

that much because I'm normally in session.

711

:

I'm on my podcasting.

712

:

I'm running with coaching

clients and with S& C clients.

713

:

I'm not basically staring at a screen

and I'll check it when I can at the

714

:

appropriate times, like you're saying.

715

:

So actually it says on the bottom

of my email, which I'm going

716

:

to say this is a free recycle.

717

:

put on there.

718

:

If it's important, send me an SMS because

then I can see this pop up on my phone.

719

:

If I need to, respond

urgently to you, we can.

720

:

And it's managing expectations.

721

:

I can't, I want to say

something around this point.

722

:

This is so common, isn't it?

723

:

That we live in a culture of busyness

and there's such an addictive nature

724

:

to what's probably a dopamine hit.

725

:

Most people don't realize

it, but you check an email.

726

:

It's a dopamine hit, right?

727

:

The phone and software is

designed for dopamine hits.

728

:

This is how it works.

729

:

These tech guys work with psychology

as we know how this stuff works.

730

:

So be smart and realize that

this is what's happening.

731

:

You're getting in a habit.

732

:

You've already mentioned habits,

Camille, about building habits.

733

:

If it's a habit, Oh, I'll

quickly check my email.

734

:

Don't.

735

:

Get up in the morning, check my

email, just build a new habit.

736

:

Put those time boundaries in.

737

:

And if anyone's stressed, the

first thing we want to do is

738

:

reduce cognitive load, right?

739

:

So the first thing we want to do,

how do you reduce cognitive load?

740

:

That means the amount of

processing your brain has to do.

741

:

Don't fill it with more information.

742

:

It's that simple at its basic level.

743

:

So by looking at your phone, if you have

a habit of checking, there is one hack or

744

:

strategy, better word, that you can do.

745

:

Breathe in, breathe out.

746

:

should buy you around 8 to 10 seconds.

747

:

That'll pull you out of your limbic brain,

which is where your habit cycles are.

748

:

It'll pull you into prefrontal cortex

where your executive thinking function

749

:

is and make you go, Hmm, I remember

hearing Camille talk about this and maybe

750

:

say, I'll mention something about this.

751

:

I don't need to check

these emails right now.

752

:

I'm going to go to the gym or for

a run or take my kids to school.

753

:

I'll pick up on the email

when I'm at my desk.

754

:

So such a good point, isn't it?

755

:

Thank you.

756

:

That's a really important point

because managing time is actually

757

:

about managing energy in my experience.

758

:

There's time is time.

759

:

Time doesn't change.

760

:

It's the energy and the application of

what you do with your energy in that

761

:

time that matters, which is why some

people can become a pro sports person

762

:

and run a business and goodness as well.

763

:

And someone else struggles to, hold

down a, a regular job and it's all

764

:

overwhelming because managing one's

energy when there are so many distractions

765

:

is an absolute sacrosanct thing for

mental, emotional and physical health.

766

:

So yeah, it needs to be said, it needs

to be said if you're trying to build

767

:

a training plan, Manage your cognitive

energy as much as your physical energy.

768

:

Now I'm really want to talk to something,

which is, we spoke about this, we've

769

:

alluded to this, but let's get to this.

770

:

The payoffs.

771

:

Now there's a lot that's known

in science around, more current

772

:

science about mitochondrial health.

773

:

Quick, science lesson.

774

:

Mitochondria are, the energy

organelles that are in our body.

775

:

mitochondria help produce the energy

called ATP, adenosine triphosphate.

776

:

They are actually a non human cell.

777

:

So it's believed a long, long time

ago, they merged with human cells.

778

:

These, these, mitochondria.

779

:

What's been found is that mitochondrial

health is vital for mental health,

780

:

emotional health, physical health, energy.

781

:

And I don't know anyone that

doesn't want a bit more energy.

782

:

when I coach people like,

would you like more energy?

783

:

It's yeah, definitely give me.

784

:

And actually cardiovascular activity,

strength building, actually, all

785

:

physical movement activity helps build

mitochondrial health and Anyone who says

786

:

I haven't got time because I'm tired, that

already suggests you need more energy.

787

:

So then the caveat is, how can

we help you build more energy?

788

:

We need better mitochondrial function,

and we know that cardiovascular activity

789

:

of any nature and some strength activity

of any nature will develop that.

790

:

It's a win.

791

:

So for those who are like, yeah,

yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, running

792

:

and all this, it's no, no, no.

793

:

This, this running down the road

will help you run a business better.

794

:

And I've got someone in front of me right

now, Camille, who actually does that.

795

:

So we know this!

796

:

stuff.

797

:

Now I'm intrigued to know, can you

give an example of your experience

798

:

of when your energies, obviously as

a woman with the experiences of your

799

:

natural cycles, which are different

to men's, but of course you're much

800

:

more, they're much more flowing and

change how you are like high and low.

801

:

How do you manage your energy and what

do you notice you get from exercise

802

:

and your, and your routine that you do?

803

:

Camille: Okay, so I spent a lot of time

studying female hormones as well, so I

804

:

do help people understand what I call

like a monthly cycle, because there are,

805

:

what I would, it's very common to have

four cycles as part of a traditional

806

:

cycle, so if you think about it like

winter, summer, spring and autumn.

807

:

certain times of the month you are

reclusive, you want to, recluse inside

808

:

in winter and, maybe do less in those few

months, few weeks than you do if you're

809

:

in summer and you're full of energy

and you've got your testosterone is

810

:

high because women do have testosterone

and it does elevate around ovulation.

811

:

So actually, that is the

time to do more exercise.

812

:

So actually, if you're going to plot

your Weak plan, you might as well over

813

:

pin it with where you are energetically,

hormonally for women as well.

814

:

So I'm often found doing that as well.

815

:

and actually some new, devices.

816

:

So if you have a Garmin watch,

for example, you can now

817

:

add on your cycle tracking.

818

:

So sometimes it's like

it's harder to get going.

819

:

I am not a morning person.

820

:

I actually hate the mornings.

821

:

I would love to sleep till nine o'clock

in the morning every day and probably

822

:

go to bed at, midnight, one o'clock.

823

:

But that's not reality, and when you've

got kids, they've got to get to school,

824

:

and, I have a husband who is literally the

biggest energetic person in the morning,

825

:

he's get up at six o'clock and then go,

and I'm like, ugh, could I just crawl

826

:

under the duvet a little bit longer?

827

:

So actually, having someone like him

around is fantastic, because this morning

828

:

at ten past six, he's can you just put

your feet on the floor and get up, because

829

:

you're going on your bike, and I was

like, I don't struggle actually anymore to

830

:

get up, as much because I love training.

831

:

I loved the fact that this morning's

bike session was probably a little

832

:

bit harder than I was expecting

at twenty past six this morning.

833

:

but I felt euphoric afterwards

and it was one of those training

834

:

sessions that I walked through

the door sweating and my kids were

835

:

like just crawling out of bed at 7.

836

:

20 and I'd already done

an hour of exercise.

837

:

I felt fantastic.

838

:

My husband had gone for a run.

839

:

I was on the bike in the house.

840

:

We didn't leave the kids on their own.

841

:

Just don't, don't, just to

put that in perspective.

842

:

And, it was amazing.

843

:

We both were like euphoric and

really happy and it was great.

844

:

Start contrast to a different day where

you stay in bed a little bit longer.

845

:

but energetically, we as women do have

peaks and troughs and it's able to

846

:

understand that a trough shouldn't be

a month or two months or three months.

847

:

There could be something

underlying going on.

848

:

You should have a natural cycle.

849

:

So around your bleed time, you are

actually have quite a lot of energy.

850

:

Paula Radcliffe ran, broke her record for

the marathon, actually, on her, period.

851

:

And, last year, or this year, it

was earlier on this year, in the

852

:

Ironman press, a lady, was seen to

be bleeding through her tri suit,

853

:

and a lot of the press said, oh,

you should have cropped that off.

854

:

cropped that photo and she was

like why would I crop the photo?

855

:

I'm out for a nine, ten hour race.

856

:

no type of support is ever going

to catch all that, so it's the

857

:

most natural thing in the world.

858

:

Why would I crop it?

859

:

Just normal.

860

:

And I think we need to have those

conversations as women because

861

:

we need to understand that.

862

:

So actually in the early stages of your

cycle, you are actually very energetic.

863

:

You have more energy.

864

:

The middle part of your cycle, you

have the most, that's when you can

865

:

schedule in the higher workouts,

the more intense, because that's

866

:

when you're gonna get the most gain.

867

:

And then the, the last couple of days,

seven, eight days before you start to

868

:

bleed again, just rein it in a little bit.

869

:

And there's nothing wrong with that.

870

:

my favourite saying is a 5K

run is still 5K if you run it

871

:

in 40 minutes or 20 minutes.

872

:

It's still the same distance.

873

:

And sometimes just getting out there and

even walking it will make you feel better.

874

:

Because the simple art of doing

something makes you feel really good.

875

:

Sal: Yeah, that's beautiful.

876

:

The art of doing something

makes you feel good.

877

:

Action is a very, done well,

is a very sympathetic nervous

878

:

system driving forward.

879

:

So if we think about sympathetic

nervous system, people have

880

:

heard about this stress response.

881

:

you've got fight or flight, really.

882

:

We've got two ways that

energy is going to go.

883

:

You're either being

hunted or you're hunting.

884

:

Or, The Problem's Chasing You,

or You're Chasing The Problem.

885

:

Or, The 5K is going to stress

you out and, make you miserable.

886

:

Or, You're doing the 5K on a

brisk walk because it's the

887

:

only way you can do it today.

888

:

It's interesting around, and I do a

lot of work around stress response and

889

:

these aspects of understanding flow.

890

:

Fight, flight, and freeze, and how

we can move through these spaces.

891

:

They're all natural, but if we're

biased towards getting away from

892

:

it, Oh, I don't want to do it today.

893

:

That's a flight response.

894

:

Stay in bed.

895

:

It's a shutdown response.

896

:

Some break of the inertia moves

you into, you can call it fight

897

:

response, but what we really mean

is engage, active, and mobilized.

898

:

And what you said there, there seems

to be some level of compassion.

899

:

Certainly if you're a woman

and you're at a certain point

900

:

in your cycle, you're tired.

901

:

It might look like it's

a brisk walk today.

902

:

Perfect.

903

:

It's all a go.

904

:

And that's still good enough.

905

:

So it's very interesting.

906

:

I've trained my partner through

all these cycles as well.

907

:

I see this with female clients.

908

:

It's very, very important.

909

:

In fact, I've got another podcast

you guys need to look out for

910

:

with about women's health.

911

:

She goes into this in way more

depth than I can speak about, but

912

:

it's so important to be with this.

913

:

And what I heard there, Camille, was

that you were listening to your body.

914

:

as a woman, it's even more important.

915

:

I'm a mid life man.

916

:

I can't listen to my body because

sometimes I can't do what I want to do.

917

:

But if we don't listen to our body, and

we get caught up in an abstraction such

918

:

as I should be doing this, and I should be

doing that Watch those language patterns.

919

:

That's about obligation.

920

:

Sometimes it's about beration.

921

:

Oh, it should be faster.

922

:

Should be.

923

:

What about you are?

924

:

Maybe I'm, I'm soft today.

925

:

I'm going to be a little easy today

or today I've got so much energy.

926

:

I'm going to go for it.

927

:

There's an authenticity, isn't there?

928

:

When you really listen to

your body and go with it.

929

:

And there's also less, internal conflicts.

930

:

Some people call it resistance, but the

resistance you feel, or any of us feel, is

931

:

that we're not hearing the right approach.

932

:

So in my experience, certainly getting

fatigued, I got more energy in the

933

:

summer because I'm light driven.

934

:

I had the SAD condition to some

quite extreme extent, it seems.

935

:

In the summer, I can kill

it, I can really work hard.

936

:

In the winter, I've got to go

a little easy on the weights.

937

:

So although I can do a lot more

weight, I back off my weight

938

:

level, weight training level at the

moment, so I don't get too fatigued.

939

:

So that I can continue to do

and enjoy the movement practice.

940

:

So for sure, what you said at the

early part, listen to your body.

941

:

It goes for everyone, whoever

you are, wherever you are, and

942

:

working with it is going to get

you far better gains and results.

943

:

Now, I'd love to, bring this to a close.

944

:

So we've spoken about how do you do it?

945

:

How do you do what you do, Camille?

946

:

And obviously I've joined you on that to

my experience and it's wonderful to hear.

947

:

If someone's listening and they're

thinking, wow, okay, so I'm a

948

:

mum or I'm a dad and I've got a

business and I do want to shift.

949

:

I want that energy.

950

:

I want that feeling you

guys are talking about.

951

:

But I don't think it's me.

952

:

I don't think I can do it.

953

:

What would you say to that person

who's doubting themselves, doubting

954

:

they can transition from being maybe

sedentary, feeling lethargic, but

955

:

they do want to feel energized,

they do want to feel dynamic, and

956

:

they don't want to age in a bad way.

957

:

What would you say to them?

958

:

Camille: I'd love to say

just start with something.

959

:

So there's lots of

support that you can get.

960

:

So one of the amount of clients I've

put through the Couch to 5K is insane.

961

:

Now, I'm not an ambassador

for this app, but I think that

962

:

breaks things down super simply.

963

:

One of my clients was 69 and she said

it was life changing and then she

964

:

went to run, park, run with a son

who's in his thirties and she just

965

:

couldn't believe ever because she's

actually got fatigue issues that

966

:

she would ever be able to do that.

967

:

I worked with a client in

Iceland earlier this year and

968

:

she had been on the sofa for 18.

969

:

Hadn't got off the sofa.

970

:

she used to do CrossFit.

971

:

seven days a week was mega intense.

972

:

And there was a lot of childhood

unresolved trauma that she

973

:

started working through.

974

:

And then suddenly her body

went into a shock, traumatic

975

:

response, and her body shut down.

976

:

And she was like, I can't do anything.

977

:

And we looked at food and how to

incorporate small exercises and, she sent

978

:

me this photo of her getting her trophy.

979

:

So about three months after we

worked together, she got a medal

980

:

of running her first 5k and

she said it was life changing.

981

:

And she just couldn't believe she could

do it in such a short space of time.

982

:

Now, it's not like I coach everybody

to run 5Ks, this is not that.

983

:

This is their specific objective and they

just so happen to want to run because

984

:

someone that they knew really enjoyed it.

985

:

but anyone can do it, it's just taking

that first step and having the support.

986

:

there's so much things that you can do and

it doesn't have to be running a marathon.

987

:

It doesn't have to be, a

hundred mile cycle race.

988

:

It doesn't have to be any of those

because everyone's objective is different.

989

:

But especially those that have children,

my objective is to be like, A young

990

:

grandma, I want my kids to have, I want

to live to 100, and we never talked

991

:

about that, but I want to live to 100.

992

:

I want to run a marathon

on my 100th birthday.

993

:

I want to do those, be physically fit

and present for the next generations,

994

:

because I think we have the opportunity

to do that now with advances in,

995

:

not just medical science, but like

nutrition and natural sciences as well.

996

:

And I think we have the objective to

do that, but actually live to 100.

997

:

Very healthily and be independent.

998

:

And I think, in this world

we've had a lot of reactive.

999

:

So if something's wrong, fix it.

:

00:48:51,813 --> 00:48:55,263

But imagine if we could prevent it

from happening in the first place.

:

00:48:55,653 --> 00:48:58,983

So it's about being a really good

role model for your children or

:

00:48:58,988 --> 00:49:02,223

people around you or your, your

colleagues or people that work for

:

00:49:02,228 --> 00:49:04,893

you about being healthy and happy.

:

00:49:05,013 --> 00:49:08,193

And fundamentally, you can

achieve whatever you want to.

:

00:49:08,703 --> 00:49:10,083

And one of my favorite sayings on this.

:

00:49:10,293 --> 00:49:16,128

is people change best when they feel good,

so when you start to feel good, That's

:

00:49:16,128 --> 00:49:17,978

when the real, amazing change happens.

:

00:49:18,198 --> 00:49:20,658

Don't feel guilty if you

missed a workout yesterday.

:

00:49:20,718 --> 00:49:22,708

Just start the new day and get on with it.

:

00:49:22,858 --> 00:49:23,438

A new one.

:

00:49:26,699 --> 00:49:28,179

Sal: Consistency is key, isn't it?

:

00:49:28,209 --> 00:49:28,829

Absolutely.

:

00:49:28,829 --> 00:49:30,699

And I love what you said

there about starting small

:

00:49:30,879 --> 00:49:32,519

because it can be intimidating.

:

00:49:32,759 --> 00:49:36,939

So that can trigger a, either

a flight or freeze response.

:

00:49:36,939 --> 00:49:37,589

Oh, I can't do it.

:

00:49:37,809 --> 00:49:38,399

Start small.

:

00:49:38,459 --> 00:49:41,499

It might look like brisk walking twice a

day and you walk up a hill and it might

:

00:49:41,499 --> 00:49:45,219

look like you start that for once a month

and then it's perhaps to catch the 5k.

:

00:49:45,419 --> 00:49:46,569

Zumba class.

:

00:49:46,949 --> 00:49:50,679

Perhaps you go and hire a PT and

Instead of spending your money at

:

00:49:50,679 --> 00:49:51,989

the pub, spend your money on a P.

:

00:49:51,989 --> 00:49:52,339

T.

:

00:49:52,869 --> 00:49:57,649

Whatever it is that is your pathway,

we all, the thing that makes you smile,

:

00:49:57,839 --> 00:50:01,279

so whether it's getting back on a bike

like you did as a kid, running about,

:

00:50:01,299 --> 00:50:03,069

kicking a football, doesn't matter.

:

00:50:03,458 --> 00:50:05,928

Camille: also, sorry, it's

also things like dancing.

:

00:50:06,038 --> 00:50:10,198

a vigorous dancing in your own

house for 20 minutes burns about,

:

00:50:10,218 --> 00:50:11,688

I don't know, 200 300 calories.

:

00:50:11,988 --> 00:50:14,908

I'm not a big calorie counter,

but it also feels really good.

:

00:50:14,908 --> 00:50:17,878

So put your favorite music on in the

kitchen and dance around with your kids.

:

00:50:18,228 --> 00:50:19,378

Get them all involved.

:

00:50:19,428 --> 00:50:21,678

Get them off their devices

and things like that.

:

00:50:21,828 --> 00:50:23,578

It just makes you feel

really, really good.

:

00:50:23,938 --> 00:50:29,238

So it doesn't have to be as well that

structured cycling, PT, golf, whatever.

:

00:50:29,318 --> 00:50:30,788

It's the quirky other things.

:

00:50:30,788 --> 00:50:34,008

It's just about moving

and enjoying those things.

:

00:50:34,468 --> 00:50:36,448

it's one thing that I really recommend.

:

00:50:38,619 --> 00:50:39,479

Sal: Thank you for adding that.

:

00:50:39,479 --> 00:50:42,589

Yeah, it's such a, such a key point

that actually, yes, we've been

:

00:50:42,589 --> 00:50:45,219

speaking, and it might seem in terms

of, yes, as you say, structured

:

00:50:45,219 --> 00:50:48,909

exercise and movement, but movement.

:

00:50:49,529 --> 00:50:53,299

So there's, we don't have the time for

this today, but there is, there was

:

00:50:53,299 --> 00:50:56,439

a study done which looked at people

who were sedentary and they exercise

:

00:50:56,449 --> 00:50:59,679

say after work or before work and

they weren't that much healthier than,

:

00:50:59,849 --> 00:51:01,079

than people who didn't do anything.

:

00:51:01,419 --> 00:51:04,439

Because if you sit and if you have a not,

if you're a knowledge worker, if you're

:

00:51:04,439 --> 00:51:05,919

a desk worker, you're sitting a lot.

:

00:51:06,109 --> 00:51:09,229

If you sit for more than around 30

minutes, those major muscle groups in

:

00:51:09,229 --> 00:51:10,989

your legs start to become inactive.

:

00:51:11,919 --> 00:51:12,609

There.

:

00:51:13,029 --> 00:51:15,999

Inactivity has a conversation

with your metabolic system, i.

:

00:51:15,999 --> 00:51:16,049

e.

:

00:51:16,049 --> 00:51:17,159

your blood sugars, i.

:

00:51:17,199 --> 00:51:17,499

e.

:

00:51:17,519 --> 00:51:19,219

how you, process food and everything.

:

00:51:19,929 --> 00:51:24,309

That means you start to go into

a different state, as opposed to

:

00:51:24,319 --> 00:51:27,469

getting up every 30 minutes, maybe

a standing desk, a little dance,

:

00:51:27,589 --> 00:51:29,119

three, three squats at the kettle.

:

00:51:29,799 --> 00:51:31,409

Movement throughout the day.

:

00:51:31,459 --> 00:51:32,549

Movement is medicine.

:

00:51:33,149 --> 00:51:34,219

Life is flow.

:

00:51:34,229 --> 00:51:37,859

If we think of a river, stagnate,

old pond, it's not moving.

:

00:51:38,389 --> 00:51:39,239

Don't be like that.

:

00:51:39,249 --> 00:51:40,239

Be like the fresh river.

:

00:51:40,239 --> 00:51:43,029

It flows and it means constant movement.

:

00:51:43,029 --> 00:51:46,449

And I want to finish on one last

thing for, I've been around the

:

00:51:46,449 --> 00:51:49,419

block a long time now, which

always amazes me what age I am.

:

00:51:50,129 --> 00:51:51,859

Cause I'm like, how did I get to that age?

:

00:51:51,859 --> 00:51:52,689

I didn't really feel it.

:

00:51:52,979 --> 00:51:56,119

So I'm 52 and I am super active.

:

00:51:56,869 --> 00:51:57,669

I wasn't always.

:

00:51:57,859 --> 00:51:59,839

So it's come to me later in life.

:

00:52:00,149 --> 00:52:02,399

And of course you and I spoke about

this Camille and you've, we've,

:

00:52:02,429 --> 00:52:05,549

we shared it here that actually

you may start later in life.

:

00:52:06,129 --> 00:52:08,399

But if you're going to live to a

hundred, which is really easy in

:

00:52:08,399 --> 00:52:11,679

today's world because of modern

sciences and good nutrition, the very

:

00:52:11,679 --> 00:52:15,157

things we can do, you Want to end up.

:

00:52:15,187 --> 00:52:16,987

I want to end up in a really good way.

:

00:52:16,997 --> 00:52:20,217

So my 70s, 80s, 90s, I

know what I want to do.

:

00:52:20,347 --> 00:52:21,487

I don't want to do.

:

00:52:21,677 --> 00:52:25,747

And I had a, another person called

Toby on a recent podcast and he said

:

00:52:25,747 --> 00:52:27,457

he uses this, this, this process.

:

00:52:27,457 --> 00:52:30,297

He often imagines he has a stroke

and like how awful that would be.

:

00:52:30,297 --> 00:52:31,737

And that's the terrible thing to happen.

:

00:52:32,127 --> 00:52:33,667

And it motivates him to get up.

:

00:52:33,687 --> 00:52:36,057

So sometimes it can be,

what don't you want?

:

00:52:36,367 --> 00:52:39,037

And I know I don't really

want to be in, unable to move.

:

00:52:39,257 --> 00:52:40,667

Unable to do things I love to do.

:

00:52:41,057 --> 00:52:43,897

So that means I invest my activity now.

:

00:52:44,027 --> 00:52:48,687

So when I'm older that I feel I

have a dynamic body, better energy,

:

00:52:48,737 --> 00:52:50,087

my brain is working very well.

:

00:52:50,447 --> 00:52:56,167

So actually long term health pension

is one of the best investment

:

00:52:56,207 --> 00:52:57,667

investments you can ever make.

:

00:52:58,167 --> 00:53:01,517

So find your compelling reason, whether

it's your kids, whether it's your future,

:

00:53:01,517 --> 00:53:04,647

whether you're really a hundred, whether

you want to look good, it doesn't matter.

:

00:53:04,847 --> 00:53:06,057

Find a compelling reason.

:

00:53:06,722 --> 00:53:10,082

start small and recognize

that it's all possible.

:

00:53:10,102 --> 00:53:12,692

Role models like Camille show you this.

:

00:53:12,842 --> 00:53:16,372

I wrote role model, whatever, if you

think of that for me, it's possible.

:

00:53:16,887 --> 00:53:20,987

It's never too late, whatever

age you are, and the body is an

:

00:53:20,987 --> 00:53:22,517

adaption system, as is the brain.

:

00:53:22,587 --> 00:53:26,517

Give it the conditions, it will adapt to

those, whether that's the sofa or the gym.

:

00:53:26,567 --> 00:53:30,097

play with that, as always, if you have,

thoughts, comments, catch me on the

:

00:53:30,097 --> 00:53:33,917

pop page, or the social, media that

you might have heard this on, I do.

:

00:53:34,127 --> 00:53:35,587

comment and share your thoughts.

:

00:53:35,827 --> 00:53:39,147

Camille, thank you for your time

sharing your wonderful story.

:

00:53:39,527 --> 00:53:40,137

you're glowing.

:

00:53:40,147 --> 00:53:41,507

I can obviously, Camille, I can see you.

:

00:53:41,507 --> 00:53:41,717

You're glowing.

:

00:53:42,607 --> 00:53:43,207

It's good energy.

:

00:53:43,427 --> 00:53:46,277

And you, you mentioned you're around

40 and stuff, and isn't it great

:

00:53:46,307 --> 00:53:50,107

as a, as a slightly mature part of

one's life that you can feel more

:

00:53:50,107 --> 00:53:52,167

energized and love that whole feeling.

:

00:53:52,197 --> 00:53:53,457

It's, it's priceless, right?

:

00:53:54,901 --> 00:53:56,431

Camille: It is, it is possible.

:

00:53:56,836 --> 00:53:57,866

so much for having me.

:

00:53:58,308 --> 00:53:59,038

Sal: Absolute pleasure.

:

00:53:59,238 --> 00:54:02,428

all of Camille's details will be in

the show notes to learn more about

:

00:54:02,448 --> 00:54:03,778

her wonderful business, The Float Spa.

:

00:54:03,808 --> 00:54:05,148

We haven't got this, there's so much more.

:

00:54:05,158 --> 00:54:07,568

Maybe, maybe she'll come back and

join us again for another podcast

:

00:54:07,568 --> 00:54:09,758

episode, but all details will be there.

:

00:54:09,868 --> 00:54:14,618

Until the next time, dear listener,

make notes, absorb, take action.

:

00:54:14,708 --> 00:54:15,608

I'll talk to you on the next one.

:

00:54:15,758 --> 00:54:16,148

Take care.

:

00:54:17,813 --> 00:54:21,083

Sal Jefferies: Thank you so much for

listening If you enjoyed the episode

:

00:54:21,173 --> 00:54:25,613

please subscribe and if a friend would

benefit from hearing this do send it on

:

00:54:25,613 --> 00:54:29,993

to them as well If you would like to get

in touch yourself then you can go to my

:

00:54:29,993 --> 00:54:39,503

website which is sal jeffries.com spelled

S A L J E F E R I E s sal jeffries.com

:

00:54:39,803 --> 00:54:44,438

Hit the get in touch link and there you

can send me a direct message If you'd

:

00:54:44,438 --> 00:54:48,128

like to go one step further and learn

whether coaching could help you overcome

:

00:54:48,128 --> 00:54:52,958

a challenge or a block in your life then

do reach out and I offer a call where

:

00:54:52,958 --> 00:54:57,848

we can discuss how this may be able to

help you Until the next time take care

Show artwork for Mindset, Mood & Movement

About the Podcast

Mindset, Mood & Movement
Human performance podcast for life and business
Feeling stuck, stressed and exhausted is bad for you, your health and your business. But it doesn’t have to be like this.

Sal Jefferies is a coach who helps founders overcome anxiety, build confidence and become healthy. This podcast will help you feel calm, confident and strong in life and business.

Sal has a unique coaching philosophy which integrates psychology, emotional regulation and embodied action. This podcast aims to share knowledge, skill and strategies from these 3 interwoven areas - mindset, mood & movement.

Each fortnight, Sal will be in conversation with a guest from a specialist field of human performance and behaviour. The week in between will be Sal's own shorter episode where he's goes deep into various topics - all created to give you the tools to become calm, confident & strong.


About your host

Profile picture for Sal Jefferies

Sal Jefferies

I believe in helping people become free - free of anxiety; to be authentic; to not worry of what others think of you. Free to create, to love and free to be calm, confident and strong.

I understand what it’s like to find life difficult, to deal with challenges and to feel lost; that’s why I over the last 15 years I have immersed myself in yoga, psychology and human behaviour. I have been on a journey of deep change and growth and I know at the core of most life choices is the desire for freedom and peace. I work with people who think deeply and feel deeply and looking to change, evolve and grow.

I don’t take myself too seriously and I bring a light and positive energy to my work. When I’m not coaching, I love reading and learning about anything to do with the human experience. I am also super active and movement is a big part of my life - running, swimming, strength training, doing yoga or enjoying being out with my dogs.